Types of tea

Types of tea

Green Tea

A lot of Japanese tea is sencha. It is the tea people most commonly drink in Japan.
Sencha is cultivated in direct sunlight, then harvested, steamed, rolled and dried.
Its unique flavor is balanced with just the right amount of astringency.

Matcha is cultivated outside direct sunlight, then harvested and steamed in the same way as sencha. It is then dried without rolling and turned into powder.
Matcha is not only used for drinking in tea ceremonies, but also has a wide variety of other uses, such as in cooking and dessert making.

This is roasted Japanese green tea. It has a unique roasted fragrance with hardly any bitterness or astringency, and has a very light flavor.
Mild and easy on the stomach, it is the perfect tea to have with a meal.

This is a mix of sencha with genmai (unrefined rice) that has been steamed and roasted to a golden brown.
The addition of roasted genmai rice gives this tea a unique and enjoyable fragrance.
At Sarai Matsusaka, we add matcha as an extra accent to create a rich color and bring out the matcha flavor.

Green Tea

This tea is made by letting gathered tea leaves wilt, rolling them without steaming and letting them completely ferment before drying.
Because we use Japanese green tea leaves rather than black tea leaves to make this tea, it has a soft, faintly sweet taste that makes it pleasant to drink even without sugar.

Green Tea

This half-fermented tea is made by letting gathered tea leaves wilt, skipping steaming, then heating them mid-fermentation.
Oolong tea is said to contain unique types of polyphenols that inhibit fat absorption and promote the breakdown of fat.

Recommended water temperature for each type of tea

Because different water temperatures bring out different components, water temperature is an essential element to brewing delicious tea.
Astringent catechin is most easily released at temperatures above 80℃, whereas flavorful amino acids are more easily released at temperatures under 80℃.
In the case of sencha, we recommend brewing at 70-80℃ to minimize astringency and bring out flavor.
Fragrant teas such as genmaicha, hojicha, and oolong tea should be brewed at high temperatures of 100℃ or above to bring out their fragrance and flavor.